Springmoor is

beauty with remarkable depth

Category: Independent Living

Honoring our Springmoor Employees

This week we honored our employees at the Years of Service Ceremony. Over one hundred employees received recognition for their service to Springmoor. Some have been here three years and others as many as thirty! Awards were given for three, five, ten, twenty, twenty-five and thirty years. The staff at Springmoor is a dedicated group of individuals all pitching-in to make this a wonderful place to live.

Congratulations to our Springmoor Employees with over 20 years of service!
Congratulations to our Springmoor Employees with over 20 years of service!

With Special Recognition and Congratulations!

20 Years of Service: Rose Fleming, Zhiying Gu, Eleanya Akaronu, and Shronda Wall

25 Years of Service: Jacqueline Daniel, Michel Davis, Kenneth Dunston

30 Years of Service: Terri McMahon, Gloria Wilkins and James Dixon

Behind the Scenes

This week, we would like to introduce you to just a few of our 450+ outstanding employees. Terra Hunt is the Dining Room Manager and has been working at Springmoor for 15 years. Terri McMahon is the Supportive Living Nursing Manager and has been here for 30 years! Dee Redmond is in an Accountant and has recently celebrated her third year anniversary with Springmoor.

Terra Hunt, Springmoor Dining Room Manager
Terra Hunt, Springmoor Dining Room Manager

What was your first job as a teenager?

Terra: I had a babysitting business when I was 13.

Terri: Babysitting

Dee: I worked for the City of Albany in a Summer Adolescent Vocational Educational Program

How many positions have you had since you’ve been here?

Terra: Two – Supervisor and Manager in the Dining Rooms

Terri: Three – Stewart Health Center, the Out Patient Clinic and Supportive Living

Dee: Two – Accounting Assistant and Accountant

What is your favorite ice cream flavor?

Terra: Heavenly Hash

Terri: Butter Pecan

Dee: Butter Pecan from Stewart’s Shops in NY

Terri McMahon, Springmoor Supportive Living Manager
Terri McMahon, Springmoor Supportive Living Manager

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Terra: When I was a kid, I wanted to be a Meteorologist.

Terri: I want to play like a kid!

Dee: When I was 8, I wanted to be an Accountant.

Where were you born?

Terra: North Carolina and raised outside of Atlanta, GA

Terri: Pensacola, FL

Dee: Albany, NY

What time do you wake up every day?

Terra: 5:15 am (Work starts at 11:00am)

Terri: 5:45 am (Works starts at 7:00am)

Dee: 5:30 am (Work starts at 8:00am. I have a five-minute commute and I am usually late!)

Dee Redmond, Springmoor Accountant
Dee Redmond, Springmoor Accountant

What is the coolest thing you do during the day?

Terra: Talk to the residents. I learn something new everyday.

Terri: Watch over the residents.

Dee: Put a smile on people’s faces!

What job at Springmoor would you like to do for one day?

Terra: Activities Manager in the Stewart Health Center

Terri: With a laugh, “Not the Executive Director, that’s for sure!”

Dee: Executive Director

What do you do on the weekend?

Terra: Sleep

Terri: Track meets, soccer games and all things grandchildren!

Dee: Shopping, walking at Shelly Lake and Church

Ken Dunston with 25 years and James Dixon with 30 years of service to the community
Ken Dunston with 25 years and James Dixon with 30 years of service to the community

Do you sing to the radio in the car?

Terra: Oh yes!

Terri: Yes

Dee: Yes and I sing walking down the halls too!

What is your favorite pizza topping?

Terra: Spinach and tomato

Terri: Pepperoni

Dee: Veggies

If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would you go?

Terra: Santorini, Greece. It has beautiful whitewashed houses and overlooks the water.

Terri: Italy

Dee: Only one place?! I have a list: an African Safari, Australia and then Dubai.

Terri McMahon with 30 years and Jeanne Gu with 20 years of service to the community
Terri McMahon with 30 years and Jeanne Gu with 20 years of service to the community

Were you on a sports team or in the band in high school?

Terra: I was in the Orchestra and played the string bass, the violin, the clarinet and the piano.

Terri: I was on the Volleyball Team.

Dee: I played Soccer and Basketball.

What book are you reading now?

Terra: I Almost Forgot About You by Terry McMillan

Terri: No books just Sudoku puzzles everyday

Dee: I am Number 8 by John Gray Continue reading →

Joining the Wait List

Why should I put my name on the Wait List? It’s a frequently asked question during a Springmoor visit and tour. There are many advantages and one that you should ask about when you have made your decision about moving to Springmoor.

The high occupancy rate in our community is the first reason you should consider the Wait List. We have been working from a list for many years. The floor plan, the location and an anticipated move date will all be part of making your new home choice. There are a fewer number of the larger individual homes in our community making the wait time much longer. Many of our smaller units will come available in a much shorter time frame. Keeping your options open is the best idea for many perspective residents.

Our campus has walking trails throughout the community and in the surrounding neighborhood
Our campus has walking trails throughout the community and in the surrounding neighborhood

Deposit

A deposit is required to put your name on the Wait List. The application fee is an administrative fee and non-refundable. The second fee (deposit) varies depending on the size unit you have requested and whether you are moving in as a single occupant or as a couple. This part of the fee is refundable at any time. You may say no to a unit if the timing or the size is not what works best and you will keep your position on the Wait List. We recommend that, if you are interested in moving within the next few years, you add your name soon as wait times have continued to increase each year.

Our theatre offers new movies and educational documentaries each week
Our theatre offers new movies and educational documentaries each week

Events

Being on our Wait List will also enable you to participate in special planned events throughout the year. A Rightsizing Luncheon with a Senior Move Specialist helps answer questions about preparing for your move. A Round Table Event with the Springmoor Staff helps answer questions about the community. During this event you will meet our Dining Room Manager who will explain all of our dining options. Our Wellness Center Director shares information with you about the forty plus classes offered in the pool and in our exercise facilities. She will tell you about options for physical therapy and the outings offered each month for physical fitness. An expert from our Insurance Department explains how they are available to help file medical claims. Many other specialists are available during these informative events. These two helpful programs provide much needed advice prior to your move.

The Woodworking Shop is a great place for our woodturners
The Woodworking Shop is a great place for our woodturners

Activities

Those on the Wait List are also invited to participate in activities on campus. Lectures, book clubs, art classes and so much more are open to everyone on the Wait List. Our residents, of course, get first priority for off-campus events but we always welcome those on the Wait List if transportation is available. Meeting new neighbors while working in the garden is a perfect way to get involved before you move in. Joining a Fused Glass Workshop in the Meraki Arts Center, listening to a English Literature presentation with Dr. Elliot Engel or attending a concert with The Dixie Land Jazz Ensemble are wonderful events and a great way to make new friends with similar interests.

Participating in Wellness Center activities is a wonderful Wait List perk!
Participating in Wellness Center activities is a wonderful Wait List perk!

The Wellness Center

Many on our Wait List will join an Aqua Fitness Class or come by each morning to use the exercise equipment in our beautiful Wellness Center. Riding a few miles on the exercise bike or jogging a few miles on the elliptical trainer will get you into a healthy routine while meeting a few of your soon-to-be neighbors. This is an excellent perk for adding your name to the Wait List at Springmoor!

Timing

If you ask a Springmoor resident, they will all tell you, “Move before you think you need to or before you have to. Come early so you can enjoy all the activities that are available.” Currently 15% of the United States population is 65 years or older. That number is expected to grow to 21% by 2030 and wait times will become even longer. Continue reading →

Clan Morrison – A Scottish Beginning

Dudley Morrison, a Scottish Country Dancer for more than 30 years
Dudley Morrison, a Scottish Country Dancer for more than 30 years

Scottish Country Dancing has been on his calendar for over thirty years. Dudley Morrison, an active Springmoor Resident, continues to learn new dances, steps and figures every week. Before he goes to his next class or an event, he receives a list of dances that each participant needs to know. Keeping up with the choreography is a must for each of the eight to ten dancers in the group. Turn by right, cast two places, turn by the left to face first corner. And so goes the dance.

Dudley’s family has traced their ancestors back to Scotland but it was his late wife, Victoria, who introduced him to Scottish Country Dancing. She suggested they take a class when they moved from Chicago to Raleigh thirty-three years ago. With her ballet training, she was a quick study. Dudley had to work a little harder to understand the language, the positions and follow the figures.

Dudley and Marjory in the Morrison Clan plaids
Dudley and Marjory in their Morrison Clan plaids

The Kilt

With his Scottish kilt and ghillies (a soft dance shoe), he has almost mastered the art of Scottish Country Dancing. He says it’s a lot like golf, “You can’t ever be perfect but you keep trying.” It’s a mind-body exercise that he says keeps him young. There are quick time Jigs and Reels and slow dance Airs and Strathspeys. A fiddle and sometimes a piano or accordion provide the music. There are over 6,000 dances and more being written today. Dudley says the best part is, if you were to go to Japan or Canada, the steps and the music would be the same. You can walk into a class anywhere in the world and know what to do next. The precision is important. That’s what makes Scottish dancing unique.

Dudley’s kilt is a Morrison Scots Clan plaid. He wears his to a formal ball with a tuxedo style shirt and jacket known as a Prince Charlie. A dance is more casual and the men wear kilts and white shirts. Women are typically in white dresses for the formal dances. He and Marjory, a fellow dancer, both wear a Morrison sash. Hers is the ancient color way, officially registered as a Morrison Tartan. Dudley’s is also the ancient color way, representing the vegetable dyes of the century and a spinoff of the black watch tartan.

Turn to the right, cast two places, turn by the left....
Turn by right, cast two places, turn by the left to face first corner

The Country Dance

The men and women have equal parts in a Scottish Country Dance. In groups of four couples, there may be a few whispers of directions but mostly everyone is silently counting bars so that they arrive at each place neither early or late. Teamwork is important. Couples can be partners but it is typical to be paired with a different partner for each dance. This makes Scottish dancing a great way for singles to join in the group. Their certificated dance instructors, Barbara, Eilean and Pam, teach at Triangle Dance Studio in Durham. Dudley and Marjory look forward to their weekly classes and seasonal events. The Valentine Tea Dance is their next event and both are watching YouTube videos to learn the scheduled dances. Aerial videos, he says, are the best to watch in preparation for the event. He has a list of sixteen dances to prepare for in the next few weeks.

Dudley's car collection began when he was ten or twelve years old
Dudley’s car collection began when he was ten or twelve years old

The Travel

Dancing is once a week. Traveling the world has been a passion too. He has been everywhere and now is content to stay closer to home. The photos on the wall and the art on his bookshelves in his Springmoor apartment will tell you he likes cars. The passion for cars started when he was a living in Charleston, West Virginia. He thinks he was may have been ten or twelve years old. He remembers touching the tire hubcaps of a parked car as he walked down the sidewalk like you would reach out to pet a dog. Dudley says, “Cars can take you places.” In addition to his everyday car, he has two in storage now: a 1988 Lincoln and a 1982 Volvo Wagon. Neither are collector’s cars. He keeps them for the memories. Fifteen years ago, with two friends, he packed up the Lincoln and took a 7,000-mile trip out west spending $1,000 on gas. Best trip he’s ever had, he says! The three travelers saw everything from their comfortable roomy ride. The Volvo has 335,000 miles on it. It was Victoria’s car and took them many places. It’s a keepsake filled with memories. He has photographs of all of his cars: a ‘47 Studebaker, a ‘50 Chrysler Imperial, a ‘53 Packard, a ‘56 Packard, a ‘59 Mercedes Benz, a ‘61 Rambler Ambassador Custom, a ‘68 Chrysler Imperial, a ‘76 Dodge Aspen Station Wagon, and a ‘81 Chrysler New Yorker, hanging throughout his beautiful home. And each one has a story or two attached to them.

"Cars can take you places."
“Cars can take you places.”

The Music

His week includes choir practice also. Music has always been important. He tried the piano when he was young but found that reading music and keeping the right hand and the left hand moving in different directions was not his talent. Keeping his feet moving to the Scottish rhythms has been easier. He finds singing in the church choir a way to fill his love of music. He has volunteered for many years in leadership roles as well. Continue reading →

Questions to Ask – Touring an Independent Living Campus

Springmoor, a CCRC, offers homes, villas and an assortment of apartment floor plans

There are two options and many questions to ask when looking at Independent Living Campuses. Choosing between a Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) and a Rental Community without all levels of care will be the first two options to consider.

A CCRC offers a resident a community for life. A resident may move within the community as more care is needed but will never have to leave. A CCRC offers Independent Living, Assisted Living, Skilled Nursing and Memory Care on the same campus. An entry fee or real estate purchase plus a monthly fee will be required. Independent residents can continue to participate in activities outside of their home and leave the meal preparation, housework, security and maintenance to the community. This gives the resident freedom to enjoy every minute of their retirement!

Springmoor offers lecturers, tours, shopping, art classes, restaurant outings and more each month

A second option is a rental community where all of these amenities are taken care of for the resident but the next levels of care will vary between communities. Choosing this option requires only a monthly fee (no entry fee is required). If you were to run out of money and the facility has no Medicaid beds available, you would be asked to make other living arrangements at a new facility. When Assisted Living, Skilled Care or Memory Care is needed, most likely the resident will need to move to another community. Hiring your own home care is sometimes an option in a rental community.

Choosing an Independent Living Community is much like buying a home. There are many questions to ask and consider. Your family and your financial planner may also need to be a part of the decision making process. Choose a few communities in your area or close to your family and begin with a tour and your list of questions.

There will be many questions to ask during your community tours

Start with the financial questions on your first visit to the community.

  • What is involved in the application process?
  • Is the apartment owned or rented?
  • Does Medicaid, Medicare or any other long-term insurance cover costs?
  • What happens if a resident out lives their money?
  • Who makes the decision to move to the next level of care?
  • Do residents retain control of their finances? Is there assistance available?
  • What is the present occupancy rate?
  • How much is the entrance fee and is it refundable?
  • What are the monthly fees?
  • What happens if my spouse and I need different types of care?
  • How has the monthly fee increased over the past 5 years?
  • What are the costs for higher levels of care?

Ask for an overall description of making a move to the campus.

  • How many homes/ apartments are there on the property?
  • What types of home are available and how long is each wait list time?
  • How do you get on the waiting list?
  • What is the occupancy rate?
Springmoor Wellness Center offers over 40 exercise classes each week

Next ask about the list of amenities.

  • What amenities are included in your monthly payment: TV, phone, housekeeping, transportation, meals, activities, maintenance, etc.?
  • What social activities are available each month?
  • Is there a Fitness Center on campus? A pool?
  • What services are available: a laundry service, a bank, a hair salon, a grocery store?
  • What businesses, parks and medical professionals are located in the neighborhood?

Medical options should be next on your list.

  • What doctors are available on campus?
  • Can a resident continue to see his or her own doctors?
  • Is Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy available to residents?
  • What health care costs are covered by the Resident and Care Agreement and what must be paid out of pocket?
  • What emergency procedures are in place throughout the community?
The indoor heated saltwater lap pool is a great place for morning workouts

As you begin to understand the options, you will also want to ask about the specifics of your home and your dining options.

  • How many floor plans are available?
  • What appliances are included in each apartment?
  • Do I get to make any decorating selections when offered an apartment?
  • Are pets allowed?
  • Explain the meal plan and dining room options.
  • Is there a dietician available for special needs?
  • Can families dine with a resident at any time?
  • Are there to-go services and/or a grocery store available?
  • Can arrangements be made for a prospective resident to have lunch or dinner with a resident?

Continue reading →

A Lifetime as a Nurse

Nina Cole, a dedicated member of the Springmoor Board of Directors

Her mother was a nurse and one of her two daughters is a mental health counselor. A nurse, like her mother, Nina Cole has spent her life taking care of others. Today she serves on the Springmoor Board of Directors offering her knowledge and expertise when it comes to taking care of our community. Springmoor’s independent residents have an on campus doctor and full nursing staff available for any health issues that arise from flu shots, eye exams, blood pressure checks, a seasonal cold or a rehab stay after surgery. The community offers assisted living and skilled nursing as well as memory care and part time home care assistance as needed. Nina’s career has given her a lifetime of nursing experiences that she can bring to the boardroom.

The Student

Born in Mullins, a small town in South Carolina, she watched her mother go off to work at the hospital each day. She said she learned to cook early in her life as her mother was often working during mealtimes. Nina’s family moved to Beaufort, North Carolina while her father was in the service. When it was time for college, she headed to the western part of the state to begin her junior college experience at Mars Hill College. Undecided at first, she soon realized that nursing was the path she would pursue. North Carolina Baptist Hospital School of Nursing in Winston Salem became her home for three years as she completed her degree.

Norton Children’s Hospital, formerly Kosair Children’s Hospital where Nina began her nursing career

The Nurse

Nina and William met during her college nursing days. The two were married and shortly after graduation moved to Louisville, Kentucky while her husband was in the seminary. She was employed at Kosair Children’s Hospital and Jewish Hospital during their time in Kentucky. Then after a short stay in Virginia, they made their way back to North Carolina. Nina’s nursing career began in Raleigh at Raleigh Internal Medicine. Becoming the Director of Nursing and managing the staff, she says, was one of her most rewarding positions. She later moved to Carolina Allergy & Asthma Center where she found new challenges treating a new variety of illnesses and patients of many different ages.

In 1979, Hospice was brought to Wake County with Nina’s leadership

The Volunteer

Nina was also very instrumental in bringing hospice to Wake County. In 1979, Hospice was in its earliest organizational stages across the nation. She became a member for the Board of Directors traveling the state to speak about the benefits and the care they provide to the patients and their families. She continues to be intrigued by the founders and the concept of holistic care they offered. The term “hospice” (from the same linguistic root as “hospitality”) can be traced back to medieval times when it referred to a place of shelter and rest for weary or ill travelers on a long journey. Today the organization is known as Transitions LifeCare and is one of the larger hospice organizations across the country. They now serve Durham, Franklin, Harnett, Johnston, eastern Chatham and Wake Counties, as well as Chapel Hill and Carrboro.

During these nursing years, she also raised their two daughters. She helped with the PTA in their schools and volunteered her services at The Red Cross and The Open Door Clinic throughout their younger years. Wherever she could lend a hand and offer her expertise, she was quick to sign up to help.

As a volunteer, Nina has assisted at the Open Door Clinic

As a volunteer at the Open Door Clinic, she, along with many other volunteer doctors, nurses, and clerical assistants offer their time to help those in Wake County that have no access to health insurance. As part of Urban Ministries, the organization remains as the only free and charitable clinic in Wake County with a fully licensed pharmacy. The Food Pantry and men’s and women’s homeless shelters are also part of the agency.

The Grandmother

When she is not nursing, she sings in her active church choir and serves on several committees, her favorite being the church’s media team. She loves to read and says working in the church’s library is great fun. She helps purchase books as well as catalog and shelve those that are donated. Nina also enjoys spending time with her five grandchildren. “Grammy” (as she is called) and her 13 year-old granddaughter are often found at the mall. “What 13 year-old doesn’t want to go to the mall?” she asks. Continue reading →

Rightsizing Tips from the Experts

Rightsizing can easily begin with one closet or one cabinet

Through the decluttering and rightsizing process, I’ve realized that it’s so much more than organizing your stuff, emptying your closets or living in a smaller space. It’s about creating a life with room for what matters most. – Courtney Carver, Be More With Less

Our experts, Pat Barnard, Susan Stanhope and Beth Wenhart, offer tips this week on how to rightsize. These three experts will tell you that this can be an emotional project to undertake. Letting go of family possessions, planning, organizing and physically moving can be stressful for every member of the family. The Springmoor residents that have recently moved will tell you – start early! Once they arrived and the boxes were unpacked, they will tell you they only wished they had made the move sooner. Their smaller home, filled with fewer things, is freeing. The clutter has disappeared and the layout is perfect. Surrounded by their favorite things, it still feels like home.

Pat Barnard of Let’s Move!

Pat

Let’s Move! manager, Pat Barnard, shares her lists to help get you started. She reminds us that your goal is to get rid of some things. Start your purging by following these rules:

  • Decide quickly
  • Handle items only once
  • Recognize what needs to be thrown away and quickly do so

Answer these three questions to see if you should KEEP it:

  • Do I use it?
  • Do I need it?
  • Do I love it?

She suggests you do one room at a time. Set a time limit each day and be disciplined. There are many agencies across Wake County that will gladly accept your furniture, linens, kitchen items, books and accessories. Knowing you are helping others makes the task much easier.

Susan Stanhope of Move Elders with Ease

Susan

Move Elders with Ease owner, Susan Stanhope, offers her expert advice to get you started with a simplified and safe new home.

  1. Safety trumps everything! Moving too much stuff can create a fall hazard.
  2. Keeping the things you love will make your new residence feel like home.
  3. Keep sessions short (1-2 hours at a time) and give yourself a reward at the end (chocolate, tea with a friend, a walk outside, etc.).
  4. If you feel you are getting too tired in the middle of a session – walk away for a few minutes. Sometimes just moving around a little will help your brain process what is happening and rejuvenate.
  5. Plan ahead for days/times when you anticipate having the most energy to do the downsizing and put it on your calendar.
  6. It’s never too early to start the process. Cleaning out a drawer or a bookcase a week, for instance, can feel very freeing. After a few weeks you will be able to see what great progress you have made.
Beth Wenhart of Carolina Relocation & Transition Specialists

Beth

Beth Wenhart of Carolina Relocation & Transition Specialists offers these special tips to begin your rightsizing tasks.

  1. Look at an item and ask yourself “Does this item bring me happiness?”
  2. Don’t keep duplicates.
  3. Give items you use just once a year to one of your kids so you can use it at their house (example a turkey roaster).
  4. Closet Tip: Hang all your hangers in the reverse direction. As you wear each item, hang them back up in the usual direction. At the end of the season, you will have a clear picture of what you don’t wear and can donate those items.
  5. Try to determine where your clutter and excess items are coming from and stop their flow into your home. If one of the issues is paper and mail coming in the door, shred or discard unneeded items as they come in. Don’t let it accumulate. Beth offers three sources to help stop the direct mail, catalogs, and credit card applications from cluttering your kitchen table.
  6. If you feel overwhelmed by this process, then it’s time to recruit some help, maybe a family member, a friend or a professional. Hiring a professional can reduce stress, eliminate family conflict and avoid overburdening your children.

All of our experts will tell you to Start Small – one or two cabinets, not the whole kitchen. Stay focused. Donate. Throw away. Get Started! Excess clutter in your home can be overwhelming. When you rightsize your home you will have a greater sense of peace. Continue reading →