Springmoor is

beauty with remarkable depth

Category: Community

The Herald: News and Views at Springmoor

The Herald's First Edition
The Herald’s First Edition

The purpose of a newsletter would be to help foster successful living at Springmoor. It would do this by helping us know each other better through reports of resident activities, accomplishments, celebrations, etc.; by informing us of plans, activities, accomplishments or needs of Association committees; by fostering good neighborliness; and by striving to keep us informed of activities, opportunities or needs of residents. (John Cameron, President Springmoor Residents Association. October 1990)

The first Herald was published in October 1990 on pastel pink paper. “Cut and Paste” was actual cutting and pasting articles. The font was American typewriter. There were a few pieces of hand-drawn art to accompany the single column articles. From the beginning to the current edition, the editors along with the technology have quickly changed the look but the content continues to inform our residents and be a well-read newsletter each month.

At the editor's desk
At the editor’s desk

The Editor

Larry Auld, The Herald’s current volunteer editor, stepped into the position last fall. As the former Principal Advisor of the School of Communications and Chair of Library and Information Studies at East Carolina University, he was a perfect to chair this Residents Association Committee. Larry brings with him a background of interests in virtual reality, visual media, history, art, photography, woodworking and gardening.

Each new editor has put their stamp on The Herald. Larry uses Microsoft Publisher to put the newsletter together. He has added a number of photos to the publication as photo journalism is an important part of any story. Experimenting with different fonts, he even began to explain the history and origin of each one as he looked for the best type style for the newsletter. He listens for unique stories in the community as he and Gabby, his little schnauzer, are out and about each day. He is quick to say that he doesn’t put it together without a lot of help from other members of the community.

Larry, the newest Herald editor, has added his touch with a splash of photo journalism
Larry, the newest Herald editor, has added his touch with a splash of photo journalism

The Contributors

There are many volunteers from the Residents Association who enjoy writing. Suggie Styres, Jan Christensen and Dottie Davis submit articles about newcomers. When a new resident arrives, they are contacted for a get-to-know-you interview. The writers then put together a short article about each new resident for The Herald. Mary Alice Hale, Springmoor’s Library Chair, keeps everyone informed with updates from the library. Upcoming books for the book clubs are always listed. Kari Richie, Springmoor Wellness Director; Leah Willis, Resident Life Director; Thom Morgan, Springmoor’s Landscape Manager and Phyllis Mayo, our Chaplain, also submit articles each month. The residents and employees are important contributors in keeping up informed of the who’s who and what’s what each month.

The Stats

As with most newspapers, there is a sports section! Game scores are always included. Golf, Croquet, Ping Pong and Shuffleboard are among the many competitive activities that are highlighted each month. Winners are always thrilled to see their winning scores at the top of the list! And not to be forgotten, Bridge players have a column also.

2016 editions of The Herald
2016 editions of The Herald

Birthdays

Larry quickly realized when he took over as the editor and chair of the committee that the publication had to be completed, printed and in everyone’s mailboxes by the end of each month. For those with birthdays on the first or second of each month, they would be missed if the paper wasn’t in the resident’s hands by the end of the proceeding month. With a smile, Larry says he keeps his editors on a tight deadline so the presses can roll on time.

A December 1990 edition of The Herald
A December 1990 edition of The Herald

The Funny Pages

A paper wouldn’t be complete without a little laughter. With each publication, you will find a column or two of puns, sayings or paraprosdokians.

  • We never really grow up; we only learn how to act in public.
  • You do not need a parachute to skydive. You only need a parachute to skydive twice.
  • To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first and call whatever you hit the target.
  • I’m supposed to respect my elders, but it’s getting harder and harder to find one now.
A January 1998 edition of The Herald
A January 1998 edition of The Herald

The News

The Herald has undergone many changes through the years. From eight pink pastel pages with hand drawn logos to fourteen pages with color photography and an updated publisher layout. From John Cameron to Larry Auld, the one thing that remains consistent is that without the volunteers the paper would not be published. The first Herald editor wished the newly elected officers his best wishes but then said, “They would probably prefer to hear your offers to pitch in and help during the coming year as the association works to help each of us have a good year. Don’t blame things – better them.” Continue reading →

A Campus in Bloom

Raleigh saw large wet snowflakes four days ago and is expecting temperatures to be in the 80s today. Over the years, Raleigh residents have come to expect several seasons all in one week! The beauty of living here is not only the fair weather temperatures but also the blooms of spring. Daffodils, cherry blossoms, forsythia and tulip trees have been in full bloom the past few weeks – some even covered in a layer of snow a week or so ago.

The buds are visible and the first few azaleas are beginning to bloom. Springmoor will soon be tilling the gardener’s soil and they can begin planting their summer tomatoes, cucumbers and squash. A new resident recently described Springmoor as a lush oasis, tucked away in a residential neighborhood. The beauty of our 42-acre campus, hidden from the busy city streets, overwhelmed him. If you haven’t stopped by to see our campus in full color, we invite you to visit soon. The azaleas and dogwoods are stunning!

The azaleas and dogwoods can be found around every corner of the community.

Tulips and flox add bright colors to our gardens.

The crisp Carolina blue skies are a welcome event every spring. Continue reading →

Understanding Continuing Care Retirement Community Contracts

The key feature of a Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) that distinguishes it from other retirement living communities is the type of contract available for your “continuum of care.” The continuum of care typically includes independent living, assisted living, memory care and skilled nursing care.

Springmoor's Wellness Center includes a heated saltwater lap pool, hot tub, sauna and an expansive exercise facility
Springmoor’s Wellness Center includes a heated saltwater lap pool, hot tub, sauna and an expansive exercise facility

Continuing Care

CCRCs provide multiple types of living assistance as your health care needs increase. Moving to a CCRC assures that, as you or your spouse need more care or different types of care, you can stay in one community and have your health care needs met without another move. The five types of contracts available at CCRCs differ in the way in which the health care costs are covered.

You will want to explore the possibilities and ask detailed questions about each type of contract as they vary from one community to another. The cost of providing health care to an individual can be assumed by the community or by the resident. With an Extensive Contract (or Life Care), the fees for entry are much higher but the monthly service costs remain the same as you move within the community to higher levels of care. In other words, your health care costs are paid as part of the entry fee and before you may need them, much like an insurance policy. On the opposite end of the spectrum, a Rental Contract offers health care on an as needed basis. There is typically no entry fee associated with a Rental community and health care costs are paid at a full market rate.

Springmoor's 42-acre campus is beautifully landscaped
Springmoor’s 42-acre campus is beautifully landscaped

The community in an Extensive Contract assumes most of the costs of the health care services. They can offer nursing care at a below market rate because of the higher entry fees. In a Rental Contract, the rate charged for health care is much higher and paid by the individual when it is needed. CCRCs typically have all levels of care within the community so a move into the community means that you can age in place. Rental properties do not always have skilled care so it is best to ask about all levels when you begin your search for your new home.

Our residents add to the landscapes with their own floral gardens
Our residents add to the landscapes with their own floral gardens

Contract Types

Type A: Extensive (or Life Care) – Extensive contracts provide housing, residential services and health-related services in exchange for a price, usually consisting of an entrance fee and a monthly fee. No additional fees are generally required as one moves from one level of care to another except for additional meals after a move from independent living. The trade-off in paying higher fees for independent living is that almost all residential services, amenities and health-related services, such as assisted living or skilled nursing care, are provided with little or no increase in monthly fees, other than inflationary adjustments. This contract pre-pays for some portion of health-related services that may be needed in the future. This ensures more predictable long-term expenses regardless of health care needs in the future.

Azaleas and Crepe Myrtles can be found along every sidewalk on campus
Azaleas and Crepe Myrtles can be found along every sidewalk on campus

Type B: Modified – Modified contracts provide housing, residential services and a specified amount of health-related services in exchange for an entrance fee and a monthly fee. It may include almost all of the same residential services and amenities that a Type-A contract offers. However, if assisted living or skilled nursing care is required, the resident will be responsible for some of the cost. Health-related services are provided at a subsidized rate or are free for a specified number of days.

Type C: Fee-for-Service – Fee-for-Service contracts provide housing, residential services and guaranteed access to health-related services in exchange for an entrance fee and a monthly fee. Contracts typically require the lowest monthly fees and possibly the lowest entry fees compared to the other types described above. Some or all of the same residential services and amenities may be provided, but if assisted living or skilled nursing care is required, the resident’s monthly fee will be provided at the going, full per-diem rate.

The greenhouse provides a perfect spot for keeping your plants warm during the winter months
The greenhouse provides a perfect spot for keeping your plants warm during the winter months

Type D: Equity – Equity contracts involve an actual real estate purchase, with a transfer of ownership of the unit. A monthly service fee will still be required. Health care is generally available at the on a fee-for-service basis at the full market rate or at a slight discount.

Type E: Rental – Rental contracts provide housing, residential services and guaranteed access to health-related services in exchange for a monthly rental payment and a monthly fee. There may be a nominal community fee at your entry. Contracts are often month-to-month and service fees may be higher than what you would pay in a comparable entry fee community. Residents under this contract may have priority access to the health care facility but not necessarily guaranteed access. In other words, access to a continuum of care may not be contractually guaranteed as it often is with entry fee providers. As with a Type C contract, the resident will pay the full market rate for health care.

We invite you to explore the possibilities at Springmoor
We invite you to explore the possibilities at Springmoor

Springmoor – A Modified Contract

As a CARF/CCAC (Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities and Continuing Care Accreditation Commission) nationally accredited Life Care Retirement Community, Springmoor is designed to provide active, independent retirement living while providing for existing and future health and personal needs.

The amenities and services, including the scheduled activities, entertainment and extensive Pathways Wellness program, are among the best and most progressive offered by any Continuing Care Retirement Community. Springmoor also offers their own Springmoor Home Care and Supportive Living as a bridge between independent living and more continuous care. All of this and more allows for an active, yet secure retirement lifestyle.

Springmoor’s onsite Stewart Health Center provides short term and continuing inpatient care including memory care, as well as a comprehensive outpatient clinic. Residents may also receive physical and occupational therapy on site as well as dental, optical, hearing, psychiatric and podiatry care. The standard for care assures that the residents receive nursing care and personal care that is among the best available. Continue reading →

Pets Are the Best Medicine

Gabby, the neighborhood greeter
Gabby, the neighborhood greeter

It’s true; those furry, slobbery, wagging creatures can be the best of companions. Pets provide a comfort system and actually produce a chemical chain reaction in the brain that helps to lower levels of the stress-inducing hormone, cortisol and increase the production of the feel-good hormone, serotonin. In fact, pets have been shown to reduce blood pressure and stress levels in humans and can actually help lower cholesterol, fight depression and help protect against heart conditions. All great reasons for seniors to have a pet! (Dana Larsen, A Place for Mom Senior Living Blog)

Our residents will all tell you their furry companions are part of their family. Some literally were part of their extended families. After a short stay, these furry friends have come to live with the residents while the children juggle their busy schedules.

Larry and Gabby, companions for almost ten years
Larry and Gabby, companions for almost ten years

Gabby

With a walk in the morning, at lunch, before dinner and bedtime, Gabby, Larry Auld’s Miniature Schnauzer, has stolen the hearts of many along the path near their villa. She won’t let a passerby walk past without saying hello and petting her. She belongs to Larry’s sister-in-law but mostly lives at Springmoor. With a busy work schedule, it seemed only fair to Gabby that she have a full time companion and Larry doesn’t mind the company.

He has had a pet in his life for the last fifteen years and growing up he always remembers a dog at home. Gabby loves to ride in the car and play with her floppy toys. She still has the energy of a puppy even though she is almost ten years old. If you see Larry and Gabby on the path, please stop and say hello! She’ll bark but it’s just a hello.

A sunny spot for Amirah
A sunny spot for Amirah

Amirah (Arabic for Princess)

Amirah, Jim and Faye Bundy’s Russian Persian cat, can often be spotted sunning herself on the window ledge. She was originally their daughter’s cat but there seemed to be a conflict with the Russian Princess and the other three cats in their house. So she was loaned to Faye and Jim – seven years ago. She is quite easy to take care of. No walks, no grooming, and no pet sitters are required for their feline. A warm place to snuggle is her only requirement.

Layla brings many smiles to the Stewart Health Center residents
Layla brings many smiles to the Stewart Health Center residents

Layla

Monica and Hank Perkins have a beautiful six-year-old Havanese named Layla. Monica grew up with a love of dogs. Hank didn’t have much interest in animals until he met Layla. She has stolen his heart! Monica and Layla visit him in the Stewart Health Center daily and the little white puff of fur loves to play “hard to get” when he’s around. Monica says she is a little flirt when Hank is around.

Tara loves to play while Simon prefers to sun himself
Tara loves to play while Simon prefers to sun himself

Tara and Simon

Nadine Tope has a dachshund and a cat living with her. Tara (short for Holy Terror), her dachshund, is twelve years old and Simon, her sleek black cat, is four and a half. Tara is always ready to play with Simon, however, he is not always a fan (typical of most cats!). Similar to a brother and sister, they are friendly and respectful of each other but have very different personalities. Tara is the more outgoing of the two. Simon is usually hiding, sleeping and sunning himself on a window ledge. Tara loves the car and a long walk through the community.

Ginger can often be found with Eunice at the puzzle table

Ginger

Ginger and Eunice Bland are almost always together in the Stewart Health Center visiting friends or at the puzzle table with neighbors. Six years ago, this precious little three-month-old toy poodle came to live with Eunice weighing only three pounds. She is constant company to both Eunice and the friends she visits in the Stewart Health Center. She gets lots of attention while she is there. Who has more fun? That’s anyone’s guess!

Linda and MoJo love to travel and walk at the beach

MoJo

A spoiled little Havanese lives with Linda Edwards. She will be the first to admit that MoJo gets lots of attention. Doggy day camp is on the schedule several mornings a week so he can play with his friends. He needs lots of socialization she says with a smile. The two have recently returned from a trip to the Bahamas.

“MoJo has never liked riding in the car and, while we were in the Bahamas, we had to go over very rocky roads to get to our favorite beaches. I discovered he did much better if I sang to him and he preferred the cadence of children’s songs but got tired of hearing the same ones over and over.  When I ran out of songs, I began singing a made up song entitled “Here we go to the beachy beach,” which had the advantage of unlimited, if silly, new verses.” The two are best friends for sure! Continue reading →

Honoring our Springmoor Employees

This week we honored our employees at the Years of Service Ceremony. Over one hundred employees received recognition for their service to Springmoor. Some have been here three years and others as many as thirty! Awards were given for three, five, ten, twenty, twenty-five and thirty years. The staff at Springmoor is a dedicated group of individuals all pitching-in to make this a wonderful place to live.

Congratulations to our Springmoor Employees with over 20 years of service!
Congratulations to our Springmoor Employees with over 20 years of service!

With Special Recognition and Congratulations!

20 Years of Service: Rose Fleming, Zhiying Gu, Eleanya Akaronu, and Shronda Wall

25 Years of Service: Jacqueline Daniel, Michel Davis, Kenneth Dunston

30 Years of Service: Terri McMahon, Gloria Wilkins and James Dixon

Behind the Scenes

This week, we would like to introduce you to just a few of our 450+ outstanding employees. Terra Hunt is the Dining Room Manager and has been working at Springmoor for 15 years. Terri McMahon is the Supportive Living Nursing Manager and has been here for 30 years! Dee Redmond is in an Accountant and has recently celebrated her third year anniversary with Springmoor.

Terra Hunt, Springmoor Dining Room Manager
Terra Hunt, Springmoor Dining Room Manager

What was your first job as a teenager?

Terra: I had a babysitting business when I was 13.

Terri: Babysitting

Dee: I worked for the City of Albany in a Summer Adolescent Vocational Educational Program

How many positions have you had since you’ve been here?

Terra: Two – Supervisor and Manager in the Dining Rooms

Terri: Three – Stewart Health Center, the Out Patient Clinic and Supportive Living

Dee: Two – Accounting Assistant and Accountant

What is your favorite ice cream flavor?

Terra: Heavenly Hash

Terri: Butter Pecan

Dee: Butter Pecan from Stewart’s Shops in NY

Terri McMahon, Springmoor Supportive Living Manager
Terri McMahon, Springmoor Supportive Living Manager

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Terra: When I was a kid, I wanted to be a Meteorologist.

Terri: I want to play like a kid!

Dee: When I was 8, I wanted to be an Accountant.

Where were you born?

Terra: North Carolina and raised outside of Atlanta, GA

Terri: Pensacola, FL

Dee: Albany, NY

What time do you wake up every day?

Terra: 5:15 am (Work starts at 11:00am)

Terri: 5:45 am (Works starts at 7:00am)

Dee: 5:30 am (Work starts at 8:00am. I have a five-minute commute and I am usually late!)

Dee Redmond, Springmoor Accountant
Dee Redmond, Springmoor Accountant

What is the coolest thing you do during the day?

Terra: Talk to the residents. I learn something new everyday.

Terri: Watch over the residents.

Dee: Put a smile on people’s faces!

What job at Springmoor would you like to do for one day?

Terra: Activities Manager in the Stewart Health Center

Terri: With a laugh, “Not the Executive Director, that’s for sure!”

Dee: Executive Director

What do you do on the weekend?

Terra: Sleep

Terri: Track meets, soccer games and all things grandchildren!

Dee: Shopping, walking at Shelly Lake and Church

Ken Dunston with 25 years and James Dixon with 30 years of service to the community
Ken Dunston with 25 years and James Dixon with 30 years of service to the community

Do you sing to the radio in the car?

Terra: Oh yes!

Terri: Yes

Dee: Yes and I sing walking down the halls too!

What is your favorite pizza topping?

Terra: Spinach and tomato

Terri: Pepperoni

Dee: Veggies

If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would you go?

Terra: Santorini, Greece. It has beautiful whitewashed houses and overlooks the water.

Terri: Italy

Dee: Only one place?! I have a list: an African Safari, Australia and then Dubai.

Terri McMahon with 30 years and Jeanne Gu with 20 years of service to the community
Terri McMahon with 30 years and Jeanne Gu with 20 years of service to the community

Were you on a sports team or in the band in high school?

Terra: I was in the Orchestra and played the string bass, the violin, the clarinet and the piano.

Terri: I was on the Volleyball Team.

Dee: I played Soccer and Basketball.

What book are you reading now?

Terra: I Almost Forgot About You by Terry McMillan

Terri: No books just Sudoku puzzles everyday

Dee: I am Number 8 by John Gray Continue reading →

Clan Morrison – A Scottish Beginning

Dudley Morrison, a Scottish Country Dancer for more than 30 years
Dudley Morrison, a Scottish Country Dancer for more than 30 years

Scottish Country Dancing has been on his calendar for over thirty years. Dudley Morrison, an active Springmoor Resident, continues to learn new dances, steps and figures every week. Before he goes to his next class or an event, he receives a list of dances that each participant needs to know. Keeping up with the choreography is a must for each of the eight to ten dancers in the group. Turn by right, cast two places, turn by the left to face first corner. And so goes the dance.

Dudley’s family has traced their ancestors back to Scotland but it was his late wife, Victoria, who introduced him to Scottish Country Dancing. She suggested they take a class when they moved from Chicago to Raleigh thirty-three years ago. With her ballet training, she was a quick study. Dudley had to work a little harder to understand the language, the positions and follow the figures.

Dudley and Marjory in the Morrison Clan plaids
Dudley and Marjory in their Morrison Clan plaids

The Kilt

With his Scottish kilt and ghillies (a soft dance shoe), he has almost mastered the art of Scottish Country Dancing. He says it’s a lot like golf, “You can’t ever be perfect but you keep trying.” It’s a mind-body exercise that he says keeps him young. There are quick time Jigs and Reels and slow dance Airs and Strathspeys. A fiddle and sometimes a piano or accordion provide the music. There are over 6,000 dances and more being written today. Dudley says the best part is, if you were to go to Japan or Canada, the steps and the music would be the same. You can walk into a class anywhere in the world and know what to do next. The precision is important. That’s what makes Scottish dancing unique.

Dudley’s kilt is a Morrison Scots Clan plaid. He wears his to a formal ball with a tuxedo style shirt and jacket known as a Prince Charlie. A dance is more casual and the men wear kilts and white shirts. Women are typically in white dresses for the formal dances. He and Marjory, a fellow dancer, both wear a Morrison sash. Hers is the ancient color way, officially registered as a Morrison Tartan. Dudley’s is also the ancient color way, representing the vegetable dyes of the century and a spinoff of the black watch tartan.

Turn to the right, cast two places, turn by the left....
Turn by right, cast two places, turn by the left to face first corner

The Country Dance

The men and women have equal parts in a Scottish Country Dance. In groups of four couples, there may be a few whispers of directions but mostly everyone is silently counting bars so that they arrive at each place neither early or late. Teamwork is important. Couples can be partners but it is typical to be paired with a different partner for each dance. This makes Scottish dancing a great way for singles to join in the group. Their certificated dance instructors, Barbara, Eilean and Pam, teach at Triangle Dance Studio in Durham. Dudley and Marjory look forward to their weekly classes and seasonal events. The Valentine Tea Dance is their next event and both are watching YouTube videos to learn the scheduled dances. Aerial videos, he says, are the best to watch in preparation for the event. He has a list of sixteen dances to prepare for in the next few weeks.

Dudley's car collection began when he was ten or twelve years old
Dudley’s car collection began when he was ten or twelve years old

The Travel

Dancing is once a week. Traveling the world has been a passion too. He has been everywhere and now is content to stay closer to home. The photos on the wall and the art on his bookshelves in his Springmoor apartment will tell you he likes cars. The passion for cars started when he was a living in Charleston, West Virginia. He thinks he was may have been ten or twelve years old. He remembers touching the tire hubcaps of a parked car as he walked down the sidewalk like you would reach out to pet a dog. Dudley says, “Cars can take you places.” In addition to his everyday car, he has two in storage now: a 1988 Lincoln and a 1982 Volvo Wagon. Neither are collector’s cars. He keeps them for the memories. Fifteen years ago, with two friends, he packed up the Lincoln and took a 7,000-mile trip out west spending $1,000 on gas. Best trip he’s ever had, he says! The three travelers saw everything from their comfortable roomy ride. The Volvo has 335,000 miles on it. It was Victoria’s car and took them many places. It’s a keepsake filled with memories. He has photographs of all of his cars: a ‘47 Studebaker, a ‘50 Chrysler Imperial, a ‘53 Packard, a ‘56 Packard, a ‘59 Mercedes Benz, a ‘61 Rambler Ambassador Custom, a ‘68 Chrysler Imperial, a ‘76 Dodge Aspen Station Wagon, and a ‘81 Chrysler New Yorker, hanging throughout his beautiful home. And each one has a story or two attached to them.

"Cars can take you places."
“Cars can take you places.”

The Music

His week includes choir practice also. Music has always been important. He tried the piano when he was young but found that reading music and keeping the right hand and the left hand moving in different directions was not his talent. Keeping his feet moving to the Scottish rhythms has been easier. He finds singing in the church choir a way to fill his love of music. He has volunteered for many years in leadership roles as well. Continue reading →